Maintaining weight loss is challenging1,2

A review of 14 long-term studies showed that people with obesity regained weight after weight loss achieved by dieting.1

Chart showing long-term studies on weight regain
Chart showing long-term studies on weight regain

Study participants’ weight and diet statuses were assessed at baseline; then their weight was measured at follow-ups for up to 7 years after the diet ended.1 These data are from a review of 14 diet studies with long-term follow-ups. Adapted from Mann T, Tomiyama AJ, Westling E, Lew AM, Samuels B, Chatman J. Medicare’s search for effective obesity treatments: diets are not the answer. Am Psychol. 2007;622(3):220-233.

 

“…the high rate of relapse among obese people who have lost weight has a strong physiological basis and is not simply the result of the voluntary resumption of old habits.”3

Also in The Science of Obesity:

     

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References:

  1. Mann T, Tomiyama AJ, Westling E, Lew AM, Samuels B, Chatman J. Medicare’s search for effective obesity treatments: diets are not the answer. Am Psychol. 2007;622(3):220-233.
  2. MacLean PS, Wing RR, Davidson T, et al. NIH working group report: innovative research to improve maintenance of weight loss. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2015;23(1):7-15.
  3. Sumithran P, Prendergast LA, Delbridge E, et al. Long-term persistence of hormonal adaptations to weight loss. N Engl J Med. 2011;365(17):1597-1604.