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The ACTION Study

The first multidisciplinary study to explore the barriers and perspectives in the sphere of obesity care

About the study
About the study
Barriers to care
Resources

Learn how the results of the ACTION study can shift the way you see and treat obesity

ACTION study explores attitude and behaviors about obesity

Obesity is recognized by leading health organizations, including the American Medical Association and the World Health Organization, as a chronic disease.1-5 Associated with decreased life expectancy and many comorbidities, obesity requires a long-term and comprehensive management approach to help people with the disease achieve and maintain successful weight loss.6,7

However, many people with obesity do not receive optimal medical care and support, often due to multiple barriers that have been identified in prior research.8,9

The ACTION Study is the first to explore these barriers and perspectives on obesity among three important groups in the sphere of obesity care: people with obesity, health care professionals, and employers. Each of these groups plays an important role in the care and support of people with obesity.

Three phases of the ACTION study

Three phases of the ACTION study
Three phases of the ACTION study

Learn how the results of the ACTION study can shift the way you see and treat obesity

ACTION study finds few people with obesity seek and receive long-term obesity care10

Despite changing attitudes towards obesity and its increasing recognition as a chronic, serious, and progressive disease, many barriers to effective care remain. These barriers are reflected in the insufficient interaction between patients and health care professionals relating to dialogue and treatment of obesity.

Conversations about weight are insufficient10

Graphic depicting ACTION study finding that few people with obesity seek and receive long-term obesity care
Graphic depicting ACTION study finding that few people with obesity seek and receive long-term obesity care

The ACTION Study identifies 5 key barriers to obesity care10

The ACTION Study explored attitudes, perceptions, and behaviors among all three groups that are preventing effective and comprehensive obesity care.

Icon of person climbing
Icon of person climbing

1. Challenges to maintaining weight loss

People with obesity engage in several serious weight loss attempts, but only a few are able to maintain the achieved weight loss

Icon of person sitting down thinking
Icon of person sitting down thinking

2. Reluctance to seek help

Despite recognition of obesity as a disease, most people with obesity consider weight loss to be completely their own responsibility, which may prevent them from seeking help from their health care professional

Icon of magnifying glass
Icon of magnifying glass

3. Inadequate diagnosis

Many people with obesity have not received a formal diagnosis of obesity

Insufficient dialogue icon
Insufficient dialogue icon

4. Insufficient dialogue and follow-up

The patient-provider dialogue about weight management is insufficient with few follow-up visits

Target icon
Target icon

5. Misaligned perceptions of wellness offerings

Employer wellness programs are not meeting the needs of people with obesity

Learn how the results of the ACTION study can shift the way you see and treat obesity

Resources about the ACTION Study

Below you will find relevant educational and shareable resources on the ACTION Study and its findings, including study publications, fact sheets, and infographics. Additional resources can be found at ACTIONStudy.com.

ACTION Study fact sheet
ACTION Study fact sheet

ACTION Study Fact Sheet

Key findings of the ACTION Study are revealed in this simple one-page fact sheet, designed to help you be a part of the solution to improve obesity care

Download

ACTION Study publications—resources for HCPs

ACTION Study poster presented at Overcoming Obesity 2018
ACTION Study poster presented at Overcoming Obesity 2018

ACTION Study poster presented at Overcoming Obesity 2018

This poster highlights the differences in attitudes, perceptions, and behaviors regarding obesity management among PCPs and weight-loss specialists

Download
ACTION Study abstract presented at ObesityWeek 2016
ACTION Study abstract presented at ObesityWeek 2016

ACTION Study abstract presented at ObesityWeek 2016

This presentation highlights divergent perceptions and attitudes among people with obesity, health care professionals, and employers and the resulting barriers to effective obesity management

Download
ACTION Study poster presented at ObesityWeek 2017
ACTION Study poster presented at ObesityWeek 2017

ACTION Study poster presented at ObesityWeek 2017

This poster highlights the importance of good dialogue between health care professionals and people with obesity

Download
ACTION Study poster presented at ObesityWeek 2016
ACTION Study poster presented at ObesityWeek 2016

ACTION Study poster presented at ObesityWeek 2016

This poster provides an overview of study results on insights and perceptions of obesity management among people with obesity

Download
ACTION Study poster presented at ObesityWeek 2017
ACTION Study poster presented at ObesityWeek 2017

ACTION Study poster presented at ObesityWeek 2017

This poster provides an overview of study results on health-related quality of life in subgroups of people with obesity in the US

Download
ACTION Study poster presented at ObesityWeek 2015
ACTION Study poster presented at ObesityWeek 2015

ACTION Study poster presented at ObesityWeek 2015

This poster provides an overview of ACTION Study qualitative research results

Download
ACTION Study poster presented at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists 2017 Annual Meeting
ACTION Study poster presented at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists 2017 Annual Meeting

ACTION Study poster presented at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists 2017 Annual Meeting

This poster overviews the finding that more older people with obesity than younger ones reported that a specific medical event greatly influenced their desire to manage their weight

Download

Obesity education for HCPs

Barriers to Effective Obesity Care
Barriers to Effective Obesity Care

Barriers to Effective Obesity Care

Highlights of the ACTION Study: These pages summarize key results of the ACTION Study and highlight the barriers to effective obesity care

Download
ACTION Study Health Care Professionals Toolkit
ACTION Study Health Care Professionals Toolkit

ACTION Study HCPs Toolkit

A collection of educational materials designed to provide you with information to promote a healthy dialogue with your patients about the disease of obesity. This toolkit includes a sample newsletter, ACTION study fact sheet, and obesity infographics

Download

ACTION Study resources for the media

Interested in learning more about the ACTION Study? Please call the media contacts listed to coordinate an interview with a member of the steering committee, and feel free to download the ACTION Study media resource available here.

Media contacts:

Liz Skrbkova (USA)
LZSK@novonordisk.com

Jakob Jakobsen (Global)
JAJK@novonordisk.com

ACTION Study Backgrounder
ACTION Study Backgrounder

ACTION Study Backgrounder

This backgrounder includes details on the ACTION Study objectives, design, participants, and enrollment criteria

Download

Check out some frequently asked questions about obesity

Get the answers

Check out the ACTION website

Visit here

References

1. American Medical Association House of Delegates. Recognition of obesity as a disease. Resolution 420 (A-13). http://www.npr.org/documents/2013/jun/ama-resolution-obesity.pdf. Received May 15, 2013. Accessed October 17, 2016.

2. World Health Organization. Obesity: preventing and managing the global epidemic. Report of a WHO consultation. World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 2000;894:1-253.

3. Bray GA, Kim KK, Wilding JPH. Obesity: a chronic relapsing progressive disease process. A position statement of the World Obesity Federation. Obes Rev. May 2017.

4. Mechanick JI, Garber AJ, Handelsman Y, Garvey WT. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists’ position statement on obesity and obesity medicine. Endocr Pract. 2012;18(5):642-648.

5. McKinney L. Diagnosis and Management of Obesity. American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP). https://www.aafp.org/dam/AAFP/documents/patient_care/fitness/obesity-diagnosis-management.pdf. Accessed December 20, 2017.

6. Jensen MD, Ryan DH, Apovian CM, et al. American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines; Obesity Society. 2013 AHA/ACC/TOS guideline for the management of overweight and obesity in adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines and The Obesity Society. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014;63(25ptB):2985-3023.

7. Guh DP, Zhang W, Bansback N, et al. The incidence of co-morbidities related to obesity and overweight: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Public Health. 2009;9:88.

8. Puhl RM, Huer CA. Obesity stigma: important considerations for public health. Am J Pub Health. 2010;100(6)1019-1028.

9. Ruelaz AR, Diefenbach P, Simon B, Lando A, Arterburn D, Shekelle PG. Perceived barriers to weight management in primary care – perspectives of patients and providers. Gen Intern Med. 2007;22:518-522.

10. Kaplan LM, Golden A, Jinnett K, et al. Perceptions of barriers to effective obesity care: results from the National ACTION Study. Obesity. 2018;26(1):61-69.

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